Category: Dental Hygiene

6 Scary Mouth Facts

October isn’t just Dental Hygiene Month, it’s also Halloween! In honor of the most frightening 31 days of the year, we’ve assembled a collection of six scary mouth facts. Read on at your own risk…

#1.  Mouth + Nose + Eyes + Ears = Connected

Yep, they’re all attached. Tear ducts feed into the sinus/nasal cavity, which shares space with the oral cavity and is also connected by the ocular nerve channel to your ears. That’s why tears make your nose run, why your sense of smell is so important to tasting things, and why your ears pop if you blow your nose too hard.

#2.  Saliva is actually a form of filtered blood.

Specialized cells in our saliva glands are responsible for absorbing some elements of the blood. Other plasma components are filtered and combined with secretions from the mucous glands in the mouth. The result helps us digest food, keep teeth clean, and ensure our talking, swallowing, and breathing mechanisms are all well-lubricated.

#3.  Oh, that dirty mouth! bacteria mouth

So, we know that our mouths are a hotbed of bacteria — both good and bad. However, most of the hundreds of strains that live in our mouth are inert – they don’t really do anything. Meanwhile, the good bacteria help protect us against bad bacteria, plus many environmental elements that invade our mouths through air, food, or beverage. But even some good bacteria can have bad effects elsewhere in the body if introduced into respiratory tracts (aspiration pneumonia) or under the skin (as in a bite!).

#4.  Not brushing could lead to a brain abscess.

No joke – teeth that aren’t cared for can form an abscess, a bacterial infection often caused by untreated cavities or tooth injuries. If left untreated, that infection can spread from mouth to the jaw, neck, or even your brain. Sepsis and bacterial meningitis are also potential complications of untreated tooth abscess.

#5.  Soda does horrifying things to your teeth.

It coats, it soaks, it accelerates decay. In fact, people who drink three or more daily glasses of soda each day have over 60% more tooth decay, fillings, and tooth loss. This is mainly because the average soda contains between 10-12 teaspoons of sugar — that’s almost a ¼ cup!

#6.  Even more about spit…

scary mouth facts

As we’ve mentioned, our mouths produce a lot of saliva – enough each year to fill two bathtubs. But over the course of a lifetime, we will make 25,000 quarts of spit. That’s 6,250 gallons, or enough to fill the average in-ground residential swimming pool.

 

 

 

 

October is National Dental Hygiene Month!

For most, a consistent oral care routine & regular check-ups are all that’s needed for a healthy, beautiful smile.

National Dental Hygiene Month is an annual observance designed to celebrate the work of dental hygienists, as well as raising awareness on the importance of good oral health.

The month-long education effort focuses on the Daily 4, a basic routine that will help you maintain a healthy smile: Brush, Floss, Rinse and Chew. The American Dental Association’s consumer website, MouthHealthy.org, recommends brushing with a soft-bristled brush. Your brush size and shape should fit your mouth to allow you easy access to all areas of your teeth and gums.

 

The Daily 4

1.  BRUSH

MouthHealthy.org promotes a five-point technique to ensure proper brushing and adequate cleaning;

  •   Place your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to the gums.
  •   Gently move the brush back and forth in short (tooth-wide) strokes.
  •   Brush the outer surfaces, the inner surfaces and the chewing surfaces of the teeth.
  •   To clean the inside front surfaces, tilt the brush vertically and make several up-and-down strokes.
  •   Brush your tongue to remove bacteria and keep your breath fresh.
2.  FLOSS

Cleaning between your teeth is also an essential component of healthy teeth and gums. The ADA recommends cleaning between teeth at least once a day to remove food particles and plaque that brushing may not catch.

3.  RINSE

Because your actual teeth comprise less than half of your mouth, rinsing helps eliminate bacteria and bio-film. Along with brushing and flossing, frequent rinsing can reduce the chance of dental decay or infection. However, you should avoid alcohol-based rinses due to unwanted side-effects in your mouth.

4.  CHEW

Clinical studies show that 20 minutes of chewing sugarless gum after a meal helps prevent tooth decay. Gum-chewing increases the flow of saliva, which helps wash away any remaining food or other debris, as well as neutralizing bacteria-born acids in the mouth and promoting disease-fighting substances throughout the mouth.

If your next appointment is during October, remember to high-five our outstanding team of dental hygienists and wish them a Happy Dental Hygiene Month!