Dental Implants

With dental implants, people are able to smile, talk, eat and chew; and do it all with a natural look and feel.

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woman with dental implants
woman with dental implants

Dental Implants

One of the best examples of medical advances in dentistry is dental implants. Dental implants are a reliable and cost-effective replacement for missing teeth. However, performing implants requires knowledge of the science behind implants as well as expertise in surgery and tooth restoration.

Dr. Meyer and Dr. Johns both have years of experience restoring dental implants, including very challenging cases.

Now in addition to restoration, Dr. Meyer and Dr. Johns surgically place the implants. For the patient, this provides the comfort, convenience and ease of getting implants from start to finish in the same office—instead of having to be referred to another surgical center for part of the procedure then return for restoration and completion of the implant process.

A dental implant is a replacement for the root(s) of a tooth, and just like the root, the implant is secured in the jawbone and to crowns, bridgework or dentures.

The science behind implants is the foundation of its success. Implants are made from titanium, a lightweight and very strong element with a special property that enables it to fuse to bone. Titanium is also biocompatible, meaning the body does not reject it. With its elite properties, titanium provides dental implants the highest success rate of any implanted surgical device.

Titanium’s ability to fuse to bone means it actually works to stabilize bone and prevent future bone loss. Implants also help support the skeletal structure and soft tissue—gums, cheeks and lips.

Articles Under Dental Implants

  • Metal Mouth? Not necessarily.

    Filed under Cavity Prevention, Cosmetic Dentistry, Orthodontics

    Teeth-straightening was first considered by ancient philosophers Hippocrates and Aristotle as early as 400 B.C. But it wasn’t until the 1700s that French dentist Pierre Fauchard used a horseshoe-shaped piece of iron that he called a “bandeau” (a form of the old French language meaning “tiny band”) that the modern concept of braces was put […]

  • Oral Cancer: What should you watch for?

    Filed under Checkups, Overall Health

      Did you know? Each year in the U.S., there are 50,000 new cases of oropharyngeal (mouth & throat) cancer, broadly known as oral cancer. Of those, 10,000 patients will eventually die from it. April is National Oral Cancer Awareness Month, and Drs. Meyer and Johns want to make sure you know what to watch out […]